Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging

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Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging

Skin has been reported to reflect the general inner-health status and aging. Nutrition and its reflection on skin has always been an interesting topic for scientists and physicians throughout the centuries worldwide. Vitamins, carotenoids, tocopherols, ...

Frequently researched antioxidants such as carotenoids, tocophenols and flavonoids, as well as vitamins (A, C, D and E), essential omega-3-fatty acids, some proteins and lactobacilli have been referred as agents capable of promoting skin health and beauty.

Additionally, vitamin C deficiency is known for causing scurvy, a disease with some manifestations such as fragility, skin lesions in form of petechiae, gum bleeding, ease of developing bruises or slow wound healing.

93 However, in a study in 2005, although participants treated with a combination regimen of topical and oral green tea showed histologic improvement in elastic tissue content, clinically significant changes could not be detected.

It is widely accepted that caloric restriction (CR), without malnutrition, delays the onset of aging and extends lifespan in diverse animal models including yeast, worms, flies, and laboratory rodents.

117 Although the underlying mechanisms remain still unknown, some explanations such as alterations of hormone metabolism, hormone-related cellular signaling, oxidation status, DNA repair, apoptosis, and oncogene expression, have been postulated.

Passi S, Morrone A, De Luca C, Picardo M, Ippolito F. Blood levels of vitamin E, polyunsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids, lipoperoxides and glutathione peroxidase in patients affected with seborrheic dermatitis.

Moore JO, Wang Y, Stebbins WG, Gao D, Zhou X, Phelps R, et al. Photoprotective effect of isoflavone genistein on ultraviolet B-induced pyrimidine dimer formation and PCNA expression in human reconstituted skin and its implications in dermatology and prevention of cutaneous carcinogenesis.

Harrison DE, Strong R, Sharp ZD, Nelson JF, Astle CM, Flurkey K, et al. Rapamycin fed late in life extends lifespan in genetically heterogeneous mice.